Can you tell what I am thinking? AI emotional analysis poses quandaries (The Week in AI)

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A host of companies across the UK are beginning to use machine learning to capture and analyse human emotions (Telegraph, £). With examples of AI already being used to collate data around people’s shopping habits, this might seem like the natural next step in the AI evolution.

London-based start-up RealEyes which raised millions in funding has developed technology capable of tracking people’s emotional reactions and attention to marketing content. Using vast amounts of video content they were able to study various facial expressions and then label with an appropriate emotion, from which the AI could ‘learn’. It doesn’t stop there as the company holds long-term ambitions to use its technology to support wellbeing apps.

A second UK based company, We are Human, is using AI to decipher sublime facial expression into characteristics traits, helping clients detect financial fraud, understand customer behaviour and recruit candidates with personality fit. We are looking at a future where our behaviour could soon be tracked and interpreted by machines to provide enhanced convenience and personalisation, and even prevent crime.

However, there are concerns over privacy with critics saying emotional tracking could put people at risk of manipulation and data exploitation. Given the already swirling controversy surrounding facial recognition, people will be far more apprehensive before consenting to an emotion analysis based on their facial expressions.

News in Brief:


Around Whitehall:

Scotland Yard warned over using facial recognition cameras

The Mayor of London’s ethics panel has called on the Metropolitan Police to cease using facial recognition cameras until it has strict guidelines in place and the technology eliminates the risk of racial bias. In a report produced by the panel, it recommended that as long as the technology could generate gender or racial bias in policing operations it should not be used.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/met-police-facial-recognition-cameras-z09xmx35w

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