Volunteering at Enfield Foodbank with Englobe

Volunteering at Enfield Foodbank with Englobe

All employees at Madano get a pro-bono day to volunteer their time a worthy cause. Michaila and Will from our Energy team chose to support North Enfield Foodbank for their pro-bono day, a charity helping local families and people in need. Donating vital supplies of toothpaste, washing liquid and toothbrushes, we caught up with Michaila and Will to ask them about their experience at the foodbank.

 

What happens at the food bank?

Michaila: North Enfield Foodbank (part of The Trussell Trust) distributes food packages to households who have been referred to them by professionals in the community – such as social workers, teachers, doctors, health visitors and others. It is run by volunteers who work in the stock rooms, at the front desk talking to the clients, or in the packing room where the food packages are put together.

Volunteering at North Enfield Foodbank

 

Who is it run by?

Will: This foodbank is attached to Jubilee Church, which provides its rooms for the foodbank to use. The packing room is also a studio space used by the church at weekends and through the pandemic to record and stream church services. The building also has a debt advisory service and pre-pandemic, a café for clients to sit and wait for their food packages to be complied. Jose, the manager of the foodbank, wants it to become a one-stop shop for people to get help – including benefits advice and so on.

 

What types of people and situations in the community are they helping currently?

Michaila: There is a real mixture of people who use the foodbank. Families on low incomes, single people, and couples, and perhaps most surprisingly, professionals such as nurses who were struggling to buy food. Jose gave us an example of a nurse who had a big bill to pay for their car (which they needed for work) and how it had left little spare money for food.

 

Did anything surprise you about the way the Foodbank operates and why it is needed?

Michaila: When we were there for the day, there was a constant stream of deliveries. A mixture of supermarket surplus food (fresh and longer life) and deliveries from the collection points scattered around Enfield. All of it was sorted and labelled on delivery ready for storing or distributing. It is a truly well-oiled machine.

The stock rooms are carefully organised in types of products – long life such as tins, jars and dried goods, household cleaning and personal care products, and then fresh produce such as meats, fresh fruit, and vegetables. The stock is organised to ensure that the products with the shortest shelf life are distributed first, and then as newer products arrive, it is all rotated, so they don’t waste any food.

 

What impact has the pandemic had on the operation and the people it supports?

Will: The foodbank had a seen a big increase in referrals since March 2020. It adapted to continue operating safely and at the start of the pandemic, donations of food and money increased dramatically. The volunteers noticed that a wider range of people were using the foodbank (see above for example of nurses) and as the country closed down and jobs was furloughed, the need for foodbanks was even more vital.

 

What are the items they most need supply of?

Michaila: Everything apart from pasta and rice! One volunteer told us that she had nightmares about pasta! It is the most donated good, and although very much appreciated, they had enough. We (Madano and Englobe) donated washing liquid for clothes, toothbrushes and toothpastes – over 200 items in total – as these are some of the least donated goods. Often foodbanks have a list of their most wanted goods online – it’s worth looking for if you are planning to donate.

 

As volunteers, what did you actually get up to on the day of your visit?

Will: We spent most of our day coordinating the goods ready for food packages. Our first job was organising hundreds of boxes of donated teabags into date order (another well-donated product – no surprise there!) and then transporting the filled crates to the stockrooms for storage until they were needed. Our second job was sorting crates of condiments into date order for storage or usage.

 

How was it to spend a day doing something so different to a regular day at work?

Michaila: It was a great experience. It is easy to get totally embroiled in your day-to-day work and live in a bubble. Volunteering at the foodbank opened our eyes to the real struggles that some people are living with on a daily basis, and how we shouldn’t take what you eat for granted.

Will: We also went with our new client, Englobe, so it was an excellent opportunity to spend some quality time with them, but also doing something worthwhile.

 

What was the most enjoyable part/moment of the day for you?

Both: Talking with the volunteers and the manager of the foodbank was definitely the highlight. Their passion and drive to improve the lives of others in difficult circumstances was inspiring and how they gave up their time without hesitation. We definitely walked away with realising how lucky we are to have the freedom to buy the food we want, when we need it.

What energy trends will we see in 2022?

What energy trends will we see in 2022?

With the COP26 presidency still sat with us, the UK Government is keen to maintain its leadership position, Madano’s Energy team provides advice to some of the most exciting energy projects from Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and nuclear through to solar and wind. Our team is focused on connecting projects to the most influential stakeholders supporting the UK’s net zero and levelling up agendas. Looking ahead to 2022, here are some of our predictions about trends and opportunities within the energy sector:

1) Will SMRs start to happen, or will fusion make the grade?

With Hinkley Point C, Sizewell C and even Bradwell B securing sizeable column inches in recent years, Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) have always been seen as exciting, but something for tomorrow. However, will Qatari investment to the tune of £80m coming into the Rolls Royce consortium be enough to progress to the next phase of supply chain readiness and site selection? They had better get a move on with a number of exciting fusion companies that are hoping 2022 will be the year to recreate the sun and limitless clean energy.

2) Do people really understand what Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is?

Our Energy practice has witnessed varying levels of understanding of CCS in 2021 – from being compared to nuclear geological storage and explained using chocolate biscuits and mugs of tea.  There is a need for companies to communicate what CCS means for net zero more clearly. Part of this will be to look past transporting CO2 relatively short distances to geological storage sites and understanding how emitters that aren’t close to storage sites can harness this technology, maybe by boat or truck.

3) Will we have the honest debate about the need for oil and gas?

We saw in recent weeks that the Cambo oil field has been vaunted as a massive win for environmental campaigners, but equally we have seen the Faroe Islands double down on new exploration. With the wrangles around Nord Stream 2 and Russian exports from Yamal, we are still going to be using considerable volumes of oil and gas in our daily lives through to 2050. With the electrification of platforms starting to come forward, there does need to be an honest debate around our longer-term dependency on hydrocarbons and where Direct Air Capture or nature-based solutions can offset our needs.

4) Low Carbon Hydrogen

Ever increasing hype around the potential for hydrogen was seen in 2021 with major investments and dedicated funds launched to promote innovation and investment. More will be unveiled in 2022, as the UK Government looks to publish its draft Heads of Terms for the forthcoming Hydrogen Business Models in Q1-2, and it has already begun the process engaging with end-users to support the development and scaling up of hydrogen technologies. Industry will continue to match and even exceed the Government’s ambitions in this sector, with trade associations like Hydrogen UK, supported by Madano, serving to support key departments to move from strategic thinking to deeper work with the sector to deliver a fully-fledged value chain.

5) Will we see a moratorium on new energy from waste facilities?

Energy from waste assets is seen as highly valuable. With money flowing in from private equity and pension funds, the sector is now mobilising around carbon capture and storage technologies. However, there is ever increasing pressure on the thermal treatment of waste, and its perceived impact on recycling rates. Wales has come out with their own moratorium on large, new scale EfWs to curb development appetite. Further parliamentary debates have asked the same question and now an open letter has been signed with cross-party support. Future proposals will need to be equipped with a clear narrative and be compatible with net zero ambitions.

 

To learn more about our Energy team, click here.

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Can we look to the future, without focusing on the past?

Can we look to the future, without focusing on the past?

Andrew Turner, Associate Director in Madano’s Energy practice, shares his thoughts ahead of COP26. With the Conference finally here, hoards descending upon Glasgow, Greta Thunberg being greeted like a celebrity and the start of the dialogue, it is now time to see what ‘meaningful and effective’ (unsure what this is in Italian/G20 thinking) discussions and commitments (if any) will come from the largest international gathering since before the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Staying relevant in the energy transition

However, one question keeps bugging me. In our race to Net Zero and the climate change commitments, can we really turn our backs on the past? Ben van Beurden’s comments were stark last week commenting that Shell ‘would not have been welcome’ in Glasgow. Whether we like it or not, Shell is one of the key influencers in the UK’s and global energy sector. Would you want your football team to play their cup final without their one of the most influential players?

We have seen the Global Investment Summit bring together exciting technologies, such as fusion, fuel cell and sustainable aviation innovators (all projects we support at Madano) seeking capital to progress along their development pathways. But with natural gas still making up a significant percentage of our energy system, and likely to do so for decades to come, we still need to look at the role oil and gas majors can play in low carbon transition.

Shell have focused on CCS; BP are a leading presence in the East Coast decarbonisation cluster and are setting 2050 net zero targets and Total have rebranded to the technicolour-dream-coat of TotalEnergies in a bid to communicate their commitment to change. We should not be afraid to acknowledge that the Net Zero, or our orderly transition as it is sometimes known, will be A) expensive B) hard work C) involve oil and gas and coal too, especially in the developing world. We can’t simply reinvent out way to a low carbon transition.

 

Accepting that we can’t forget the past

When we talk about ‘difficult choices’ we see the COP26 President Alok Sharma finding it ‘difficult’ to commit either way on Andrew Marr. We know that there will be changes to our lifestyles – whether that be subtle comments about eating less meat, or increases in taxes for long-haul flights. Things are changing.

The deeper communications issue for me, is the reality that every day we use oil and gas. Whether we like it or not, oil and gas underpins all our activity. We can’t drive our cars, drink a bottle of water or work on our laptops without it. Hydrocarbons play a key role in our society, however, this is not communicated clearly enough by organisations, individuals, and governments. Sure, there can be eye catching headlines from the PM about plastic recycling not working. Focusing exclusively on wind farms, battery plants and fusion distracts from key issues, such as where the oil and gas is going to come from to sustain our lifestyles and how we can ensure this is as low carbon as possible.

The central challenge is how we transition away from these sources of energy, as quickly as possible, but recognising some industries cannot simply be electrified at the flip of a switch. Project narratives and communications plans need to acknowledge the energy mix, today, tomorrow and in the decades to 2050. Stakeholders, whether that be investors, communities or the media are demanding more and more information to make their own decisions about how investments today will impact balance sheets and dividends in our Net Zero society.

 

What to expect from Glasgow?

We have already seen strong language from the PM around the clock ticking to midnight, Prince Charles coming to the table and Glasgow being the ‘best, last hope’ to hit our 1.5-degree ambition. The UK ranks 5th in the league table for cumulative carbon emissions and this means we have a sizeable role to play in supporting global decarbonisation. One of the core pillars of this COP is to increase financial support for the developing world to deliver $100bn climate financing a year alongside greater collaboration.

Looking closer to home, big issues like Cambo or continuation of hydrocarbon production will not be resolved this week, but with organisations calling for quicker and more transformational change to Net Zero we must recognise that our lifestyles can’t be left behind.

 

Madano Energy practice advises clients in the energy transition, infrastructure, and development sectors to shape their narrative, engage with Government and stakeholders and to communicate their objectives in creative and impactful ways. If you would like to speak to the author, Andrew Turner, or a member of the team, please contact us: [email protected].

Photo Credit: Markus Spiske on Unsplash

The UK’s First Ever Hydrogen Strategy – What Happens Now?

The UK’s First Ever Hydrogen Strategy – What Happens Now?

The UK Hydrogen Strategy provides a welcome route map for the sector but there’s still much more work to be done

August was a big month for the hydrogen industry with the long-awaited publication of the UK ‘s first ever Hydrogen Strategy.

The strategy showed how far the industry has come in convincing policymakers about the potential benefits of hydrogen within a very short time. It set out a clear direction of travel, with policy commitments set to unlock over £4 billion in investment and create thousands of jobs by the end of the decade. The government will support multiple technologies by taking a twin track approach to ‘green’ hydrogen, produced by using electrolysers powered with renewable energy, and ‘blue’ hydrogen production, enabled by carbon capture processes. The strategy contained funding options for hydrogen projects across the supply chain, including a £240 million Net Zero Hydrogen Fund, and a “preferred Hydrogen Business Model” will be designed to overcome the cost gap between low- carbon hydrogen and fossil fuels.

Still, the industry’s journey is far from over. Before the policy framework is finalised, there will be formal consultations on the preferred Hydrogen Business Model and the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund, as well as a ‘UK Low Carbon Hydrogen Standard’ and a hydrogen production strategy. A decision on using hydrogen for home heating has been put off until 2026. And the 5GW target may yet be increased. These provide the industry with a big opportunity to shape government policies on hydrogen. Government and the industry will need to work together to deliver the policies needed to support innovation, boost investment, and scale up low-carbon hydrogen in the 2020s.

The Hydrogen Strategy highlighted another, parallel challenge: the need for both the industry and government to look beyond Whitehall to achieve these goals. Local authorities will be important in ensuring adoption of hydrogen at the local level. The supply chain will need to scale up and reskill the hydrogen sector. And of course, public buy-in will ultimately be needed. The sector is increasingly aware of these imperatives and the government’s strategy contained a welcome commitment to work with industry, trade unions, the devolved administrations, local authorities, and enterprise agencies to support sustained and quality jobs.

Both industry and government seem to have their work cut out. Research over recent years has found that public knowledge of hydrogen and hydrogen blending is low. Likewise, many local authorities appear to have a limited appreciation of hydrogen, its potential and applications.

There is, however, a growing level of interest and debate around the role of hydrogen in delivering net zero and creating a prosperous economy. For instance, in the ten days following the launch of the Hydrogen Strategy, it was the subject of more than 440 articles in leading UK publications, a jump of more than 350 per cent on the previous ten-day period. While most of these articles appeared on 17 August, the day of the strategy’s publication, there was a steady drumbeat of coverage and commentary afterwards, with around 20 articles about the strategy appearing per day.

With key policies still to be finalised, important audiences yet to be informed and convinced about hydrogen’s potential, and a media that is becoming more interested, the hydrogen industry has big challenges ahead – and a great deal to play for.

On Tuesday 7 September, the Hydrogen Taskforce, a coalition of the industry’s largest organisations, will launch a major campaign to show how hydrogen can play a leading role in accelerating the UK’s journey towards net zero. The Building a Hydrogen Society campaign will showcase the many benefits for local communities of applying hydrogen in running public transport, powering our industries.

By Neil Stockley, Director of the Energy team. Madano advises clients across the Energy sector, if you’re interested in learning more, please contact: [email protected]

Madano bolsters Energy practice with addition of new Director Neil Stockley

Madano bolsters Energy practice with addition of new Director Neil Stockley

Strategic communications and insights consultancy Madano has appointed Neil Stockley as a Director in its growing Energy practice.

Drawing on a wealth of political and communications consultancy experience, gained right across the energy sector, Neil will provide senior counsel to Madano’s range of clients in the low-carbon and clean energy space. He previously served in Director roles at Bell Pottinger and MHP following his tenure as Director of Policy for the Liberal Democrats.

Commenting on his new position, Neil said: “This is an exciting and challenging time for the energy sector, with the drive to net-zero emissions, and Madano is supporting some of the most exciting innovators who are at the heart of the energy transition. I’m looking forward to working with our clients to help shape the future of the industry.”

Michael Evans, Managing Partner at Madano, said of Neil’s appointment: “For more than two decades, Neil has helped organisations across the energy sector overcome policy, regulatory and political challenges in the context of the increasing drive towards decarbonisation. His expertise will only serve to improve the Energy practice’s offering and contribute to Madano’s sustained growth.”

Madano’s Energy practice provides specialist communications support to companies and organisations in the energy and environment sectors, with a focus on the low-carbon economy and clean energy sector. The practice’s deep and long-standing expertise helps clients make sense of industry developments by tracking emerging government policy, managing media sentiment, overseeing campaign delivery and engaging with key stakeholders.

Madano Analysis – Budget 2021 and Build Back Better, the plan for growth

Madano Analysis – Budget 2021 and Build Back Better, the plan for growth

Alongside a Budget that focused heavily on the immediate actions required to return to growth and respond to the economic impacts of Covid-19, the Government published Build Back Better, its plan for growth, a new economic strategy for the post-Brexit, post-pandemic world with technology, net zero and innovation at its heart.  

Autumn’s Comprehensive Spending Review will still be significant in putting this to work longer term, but Build Back Better makes clear that today’s Budget, and recent announcements such as the £800m ARIA and the Green Industrial Revolution, are part of a bigger picture for the Government. Its three pillars are infrastructure, skills and innovation. New strategies expected over the next year, such as a Hydrogen Strategy, Innovation Strategy, a Transport Decarbonisation Strategy, and Digital Strategy, will all connect back to Build Back Better. 

It aims to build a connecting economic narrative for the future of the UK, with leadership in science and innovation, and the transition to net zero, all creating transformative changes in productivity and quality of life in regions across the country.  

Our highlights included: 

  • The new Future Fund: Breakthrough, a £375m public-private fund to invest in promising, R&D-intensive companies ready to scale up with equity rounds of over £20m, showing Government’s seriousness about a greater appetite for risk and supporting companies directly. 
  • The launch of the new National Infrastructure Bank, expected to deliver £12bn in public and sector project investment from Spring onwards and drive forward new net zero projects. 
  • Freeports, eight new economic zones spread across nearly every region, with special regulatory, development and taxation rules to incentivise high-tech investment. 
  • Several commitments on green finance, including a change to the Bank of England’s remit to include environmental sustainability, and new green savings products and bonds. 

Levelling up remains a key focus. Alongside freeports, the location of the new National Infrastructure Bank in Leeds and the Treasury’s new Darlington hub make that abundantly clear. 

Undoubtedly, the focus today will be on measures taken by the Chancellor to safeguard the economy as the UK travels on the roadmap towards the end of COVID-19 restrictions. But today’s Build Back Better plan demonstrates that when the Conservatives go to the electorate at the end of this Parliament, they will be expecting to do so having established a more productive economy that leads in innovative industries, and is making strides towards a lower carbon energy system.

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